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ROSE ARRANGING - In the Oriental Manner
by JoAnne Brehm, ARS Accredited Arrangement Judge and TCRS Member

This year's rose show schedule includes two sections for arrangements In the Oriental Manner. The section for large roses has one class for using a low container, typically called Moribana, and one for using tall container, typically called Nageire. The section for miniature roses has two classes in which either container type can be used. To start, some similarities between Moribana (low container) and Nageire (tall container) design are:

- 3 main lines - Heaven, Man, and Earth; the heaven line is about 1.5 to 3 times as long as height plus width of the vase (plus amount in vase); the Man line is about 2/3 to 3/4 the length of the Heaven line (plus amount in vase ); the Earth line is about 1/3 to 1/2 the length of the Heaven line (plus amount in vase)

- 3 main lines form an asymmetrical (irregular) triangle - no matter where you look at he design, from the top or from any side, the tips of the 3 main lines form a triangle where no tow sides are the same length

- supports lines can be used in addition to the 3 main lines, usually made up of individual flowers

- plant material is placed to follow natural growth habits, simple construction, restraint in the use of plant material

 

Materials for a Moribana (low container) or a Nageire (tall container) Arrangement

- simple, shallow container or bowl (round, rectangular, oval, or square) for Moribana - solid earth tone color or black OR simple tall container for Nageire - solid earth tone color or black

- 1 needlepoint holder and florist putty for Moribana OR oasis soaked until wet, cut to size, and wire for Nageire

- 3 small tree branches (cut as described about for Heaven, Man, and Earth lines) - Japanese maple, cherry, crabapple

- 3 roses used for support lines - approximately 1/2 to 2/3 open, fresh, groomed, all the same or similar in color, rose color compatible with container color

- pruners to cut plant material, water to fill container, pebbles are optional for Moribana

 

Steps for Creating a Moribana (low container) Arrangement

1. Place florist putty on needlepoint holder and place til on the left side, either front of back of the container.

2. Place Heaven line in erect position in the needlepoint holder, tilted a couple of inches to the left and front of center.

3. Place man line in the holder behind Heaven line and then slant it about 30 degrees to the back left.

4. Place Earth line in the holder to the right of the Heaven and Man lines and slant it about 70 degrees to the front right.

5. Cut one rose to about 1/3 of the Heaven line length and place it in the holder between the Heaven and Earth lines slanting slightly to the front.

6. Cut the other two roses somewhat shorter than the first rose, place them in front of the first rose, and slant them slightly to the front.

7. Add optional pebbles around needle point holder (holder does not need to be completely hidden for Moribana arrangement), fill container wither water.

 

Steps for Creating a Nageire (tall container) Arrangement

1. Place wet oasis in container, use wire to stabilize branches by wrapping them together if needed.

2. Perform steps 2-7 as for Moribana design, using diagram as a guide for positioning lines and 2-3 roses.

Drawings of 
the 
Moribana and Nageire design forms

Here are 2 examples from the TCRS 2000 Rose Show in Class 7 "Moonglow":Design in the Oriental Manner using a low container.

A photo of a 
entry
in the TCRS 2000
Rose Show in Class 7
'Moonglow':Design in the Oriental Manner using a low container. A photo of a entry in the TCRS 2000 Rose Show in Class 7
'Moonglow':Design in the Oriental Manner using a low container.

A photo of a entry in the TCRS 2001 Rose Show in Class 7
'Moonglow':Design in the Oriental Manner using a low container. A photo of a entry in the TCRS 2001 Rose Show in 'Moonglow':Design in the Oriental Manner.

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This page last updated: May 24, 2002.
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